By Bright Dickson

For many employers, a benefit of understanding your Millennial employees in depth is the opportunity to effectively train them to be future leaders of your organization. The BB&T Leadership Institute helps organizations and individuals navigate the challenges of developing leadership talent. Celebrating and learning from generational differences and capitalizing on their commonalities can improve leadership training. Here are a few strategies:

Be A Mentor, Find A Mentor Mill-Leaders-Art-mentor

An important impact on Millennials from the Great Recession has been a delay in their employment development due to their inability to find a career-worthy job and struggling with financial issues. According to a 2012 U.S. Chamber of Commerce/National Chamber Foundation study, more than a third of Millennial adults admit to being distracted on the job or having taken time off because of personal financial issues.

As younger employees face these challenges, companies can help them catch-up at work with assistance from experienced mentors.

If you are a Boomer or GenXer consider taking a Millennial under your wing and teach them about your organization. Show them how things have been done, and explain why. Your experience is invaluable and will help accelerate the development of the next generation of leaders. Not every tough business lesson needs to be learned first-hand. Taking advantage of the experience of Boomers and GenXers will pay dividends for your company’s future.

Use Everyone’s StrengthsMill-Leaders-Art-strengths

Millennials have a firm grip on current technology and have integrated it into their lives unlike any other generation. For example, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center study, 90% of Millennials use social networking sites while only 65% of all adults use them. Boomers are typically adept at understanding and navigating more analog systems – particularly social systems. Identifying and understanding generational strengths helps you gage organizational capabilities and use employee’s strengths to your organization’s advantage.

Recognize Generational PrioritiesMill-Leaders-Art-generational

Millennials are just as concerned with profit and organizational stability as other generations, but they also assign value to social impact and employee well-being. We know all four priorities are important to the long-term success of an organization. Ensure your organization works together to find ways to include profit, stability, social impact and employee well-being in planning and decision-making.

Great leaders of any generation take the best of what their employees have to give to solve tough problems and create beneficial change. Effective leaders must be committed to identifying and appreciating a diversity of strengths and skills from associates of all ages.

By Bright Dickson

For many employers, a benefit of understanding your Millennial employees in depth is the opportunity to effectively train them to be future leaders of your organization. The BB&T Leadership Institute helps organizations and individuals navigate the challenges of developing leadership talent. Celebrating and learning from generational differences and capitalizing on their commonalities can improve leadership training. Here are a few strategies:

Be A Mentor, Find A Mentor

Mill-Leaders-Art-mentorAn important impact on Millennials from the Great Recession has been a delay in their employment development due to their inability to find a career-worthy job and struggling with financial issues. According to a 2012 U.S. Chamber of Commerce/National Chamber Foundation study, more than a third of Millennial adults admit to being distracted on the job or having taken time off because of personal financial issues.

As younger employees face these challenges, companies can help them catch-up at work with assistance from experienced mentors.

If you are a Boomer or GenXer consider taking a Millennial under your wing and teach them about your organization. Show them how things have been done, and explain why. Your experience is invaluable and will help accelerate the development of the next generation of leaders. Not every tough business lesson needs to be learned first-hand. Taking advantage of the experience of Boomers and GenXers will pay dividends for your company’s future.

Use Everyones Strengths

Mill-Leaders-Art-strengthsMillennials have a firm grip on current technology and have integrated it into their lives unlike any other generation. For example, according to a 2015 Pew Research Center study, 90% of Millennials use social networking sites while only 65% of all adults use them. Boomers are typically adept at understanding and navigating more analog systems – particularly social systems. Identifying and understanding generational strengths helps you gage organizational capabilities and use employee’s strengths to your organization’s advantage.

Recognize Generational Priorities

Mill-Leaders-Art-generationalMillennials are just as concerned with profit and organizational stability as other generations, but they also assign value to social impact and employee well-being. We know all four priorities are important to the long-term success of an organization. Ensure your organization works together to find ways to include profit, stability, social impact and employee well-being in planning and decision-making.

Great leaders of any generation take the best of what their employees have to give to solve tough problems and create beneficial change. Effective leaders must be committed to identifying and appreciating a diversity of strengths and skills from associates of all ages.

About the Author

Bright Dickson, MAPP

Bright Dickson, MAPP

Consultant, BB&T Leadership Institute

Bright works with organizations and leaders to increase optimism, connection, and performance through enhanced awareness. Bright earned a B.A. from Columbia University and a Master’s of Applied Positive Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.