Leading by Reaching Out

Guided by the footsteps of his father, Luis Lobo is a leading voice in multicultural banking and among those reaching out to immigrants who share his father’s aspirations. The Lobo family left Costa Rica in 1964 to pursue a better life in the United States.

Lobo, who serves as BB&T’s Multicultural Banking manager, exhibits boundless enthusiasm for helping new U.S. citizens succeed. His passion for, and commitment to, this vision is so great he was awarded a 2015 Ellis Island Medal of Honor in May. The award recognizes those who represent the very essence of the American way of life and have greatly contributed to our national identity while preserving the distinct values and heritage of their ancestors.

Luis Lobo BB&T Perspectives Magazine

Luis Lobo, Multicultural Banking Manager, BB&T

Ask those who know Lobo about his leadership style and you’ll hear words like “collaborative,” “exuberant,” “positive,” “genuine” and “authentic.” It’s a style Lobo learned from his first leadership model – his father, Gerardo “Jerry” Lobo.

Leadership Model

Luis-Lobo-Father

Gerardo “Jerry” Lobo

“My father was my first real leadership example,” Lobo said. “He brought us to the United States from Costa Rica when we were very young because he wanted the best for us and believed the U.S. offered that opportunity. He had the courage to take the risk, but also the self-confidence to know he could succeed. While my father always worked hard, he also had help along the way, and he believed it was his duty to reach out and help others who had the courage to better themselves.

“One of the ways I’ve adopted the lessons from my father is to ensure BB&T is sharing financial knowledge with new citizens in our country,” he said. “Financial knowledge helps us make better decisions and have better lives. Some people and businesses look at our engagement and effort as a risk. But, I think people who have taken a significant risk to get here are the most committed to succeeding. It’s what my father taught me – give deserving, motivated, capable people a hand up.”

Authenticity and Commitment

Lobo values authenticity and a commitment to stand behind your values and principles even though at times it may be difficult or uncomfortable. His list of those who have served as leaders and role models throughout his career is extensive, but his long relationship with Chairman and CEO Kelly S. King stands out.

“I began working with Kelly early in my career,” Lobo said. “He was and is authentic, honest, purposeful, consistent and clear with clients and associates. I’ve been with BB&T for more than 30 years, and he has always walked the talk. I’ve done my best to set that same standard.”

King, and others Lobo identifies as leaders, share certain traits. They have their own vision and values; the ability to give credit where it’s due, and to identify and harness complementary skills to create effective teams; and the desire to see others succeed.

“To demonstrate your values and achieve your vision, you have to be approachable,” Lobo said. “Your effectiveness depends on people getting a real sense of who you are. If you expect people to follow you, they need to see your actions support your words and beliefs. They need to know you can be trusted and you have a genuine interest, not only in accomplishing your vision, but in helping them achieve their goals. I try to live my life that way.”

Leading by Reaching Out

Guided by the footsteps of his father, Luis Lobo is a leading voice in multicultural banking and among those reaching out to immigrants who share his father’s aspirations. The Lobo family left Costa Rica in 1964 to pursue a better life in the United States.

Lobo, who serves as BB&T’s Multicultural Banking manager, exhibits boundless enthusiasm for helping new U.S. citizens succeed. His passion for, and commitment to, this vision is so great he was awarded a 2015 Ellis Island Medal of Honor in May. The award recognizes those who represent the very essence of the American way of life and have greatly contributed to our national identity while preserving the distinct values and heritage of their ancestors.

Luis Lobo BB&T Perspectives Magazine

Luis Lobo, Multicultural Banking Manager, BB&T

Ask those who know Lobo about his leadership style and you’ll hear words like “collaborative,” “exuberant,” “positive,” “genuine” and “authentic.” It’s a style Lobo learned from his first leadership model – his father, Gerardo “Jerry” Lobo.

Leadership Model
Luis-Lobo-Father

Gerardo “Jerry” Lobo

“My father was my first real leadership example,” Lobo said. “He brought us to the United States from Costa Rica when we were very young because he wanted the best for us and believed the U.S. offered that opportunity. He had the courage to take the risk, but also the self-confidence to know he could succeed. While my father always worked hard, he also had help along the way, and he believed it was his duty to reach out and help others who had the courage to better themselves.

“One of the ways I’ve adopted the lessons from my father is to ensure BB&T is sharing financial knowledge with new citizens in our country,” he said. “Financial knowledge helps us make better decisions and have better lives. Some people and businesses look at our engagement and effort as a risk. But, I think people who have taken a significant risk to get here are the most committed to succeeding. It’s what my father taught me – give deserving, motivated, capable people a hand up.”

Authenticity and Commitment

Lobo values authenticity and a commitment to stand behind your values and principles even though at times it may be difficult or uncomfortable. His list of those who have served as leaders and role models throughout his career is extensive, but his long relationship with Chairman and CEO Kelly S. King stands out.

“I began working with Kelly early in my career,” Lobo said. “He was and is authentic, honest, purposeful, consistent and clear with clients and associates. I’ve been with BB&T for more than 30 years, and he has always walked the talk. I’ve done my best to set that same standard.”

King, and others Lobo identifies as leaders, share certain traits. They have their own vision and values; the ability to give credit where it’s due, and to identify and harness complementary skills to create effective teams; and the desire to see others succeed.

“To demonstrate your values and achieve your vision, you have to be approachable,” Lobo said. “Your effectiveness depends on people getting a real sense of who you are. If you expect people to follow you, they need to see your actions support your words and beliefs. They need to know you can be trusted and you have a genuine interest, not only in accomplishing your vision, but in helping them achieve their goals. I try to live my life that way.”